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Friday, February 28, 2014

The Benefits Of Resistance Training For Both Younger And Older Adults


Photo: Scott pulls off a 30lb PR with 455lbs on the trap bar deadlift.

Adults can benefit from resistance training, regardless of age, because of the versatility of this form of training. All adults need a level of strength and muscular endurance to simply carry out daily life activities, maintain posture and mobility.

With resistance training, there are many variables and options to choose from. The type of training can be tailored to an age group’s needs to meet certain goals. Also in today’s busy world, resistance training has the versatility to be modified by time while still providing maximal benefits (Paoli, A., Moro, T., Marcolin, G., Neri, M., Bianco, A., Palma, A., Grimaldi, K., 2012).



Adults of all ages can also benefit from resistance training by increasing their daily resting energy expenditure, raising metabolic hormone levels while improving their metabolism and body composition. These benefits positively impact long term health while increasing quality of life and the functional aspects of daily life activities (Paoli, A., Moro, T., Marcolin, G., Neri, M., Bianco, A., Palma, A., Grimaldi, K., 2012).

Resistance training benefits for all age groups can include an increase or improvement in strength, power output, muscular endurance, core and total body stabilization and energy expenditure, in addition to many other benefits (Gennuso, K., Zalewski, K., Cashin, S., Strath, S., 2013).



With older adults, resistance training has been shown to improve or increase strength, functional ability, mobility and the ability to execute daily life activities more efficiently. Resistance training has been shown to have positive effects on aging and conditions such as muscle atrophy, sarcopenia, osteopenia and other mobility reducing conditions (Aarskog, R., Wisnes, A., Wilhelmsen, K., Skogen, A., Bjordal, J., 2012).

Due to the innumerable benefits outlined in these studies, I choose resistance training as the exercise method of choice for both healthy young adults and healthy older adults.

References:

Gennuso, K., Zalewski, K., Cashin, S., Strath, S. (2013). Resistance Training Congruent With Minimal Guidelines Improves Function in Older Adults: A Pilot Study. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 10, 769-776.

Aarskog, R., Wisnes, A., Wilhelmsen, K., Skogen, A., Bjordal, J. (2012). Comparison of Two Resistance Training Protocols, 6RM versus 12RM, to Increase the 1RM in Healthy Young Adults. A Single-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial. Physiotherapy Research International, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p179 8p.

Paoli, A., Moro, T., Marcolin, G., Neri, M., Bianco, A., Palma, A., Grimaldi, K. (2012). High-Intensity Interval Resistance Training (HIRT) influences resting energy expenditure and respiratory ratio in non-dieting individuals. Journal of Translational Medicine, 10:237.

Eric Dempsey
NASM Certified Personal Trainer & Weight Loss Specialist

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Garcinia Cambogia: Wonder Pill or Scam?

Photo: Dr Oz said this was the stuff. Hype or fact? We shall see. I'm gonna try it for a month and see what happens. I'm not expecting much.

My trial month of using Garcinia Cambogia Extract which reportedly "Supports Appetite Control & Inhibits Fat Production" is over.
 
My findings: After taking two capsules a day for about a month, I noticed absolutely NOTHING. I gained 3lbs, and bodyfat % and waist measurements stayed constant. 

Photo: Fat boy update: My trial month of using Garcinia Cambogia Extract which reportedly "Supports Appetite Control & Inhibits Fat Production" is done. 
My findings: After taking two capsules a day for about a month, I noticed absolutely NOTHING. I gained 3lbs, and bodyfat % and waist measurements stayed constant. 
Appetite control? I only ate 2 large pizzas in one sitting because I was starving - does that count? My bodyfat % stayed fairly constant so maybe it kept me from getting fatter? 
Enough of that nonsense. Wonder pill study is over. I'm returning to the proven methods of training hard and eating right.

Appetite control? I only ate 2 large pizzas in one sitting because I was starving - does that count? My bodyfat % stayed fairly constant so maybe it kept me from getting fatter? 

I have heard a bunch of people say that this stuff either worked miracles for them or didn't do anything at all. And that is probably the reality of it. It works for some people and not for others. I think all nutritional supplements and medications and damn near anything fall into this category. It works for some people but not for everyone. Everyone is different. 

It didn't work for me so I have to write it off. If it worked for you, I'm glad. 

If you didn't have any luck with Garcinia Cambogia and are looking for something that might actually work. Check this out. This is what I usually take and recommend to my clients.

Wonder pill study is over. I'm returning to the proven methods of training hard and eating right.

Eric Dempsey
NASM Certified Personal Trainer & Weight Loss Specialist

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

The Diaphragm And Core Training: The Connection




Bracing, diaphragm breathing, the drawing in method and other techniques are well known through the fitness industry as methods or techniques to help train and prepare the core muscle to stabilize the spine during movement and exertion. The diaphragm is the foundation to postural or core stabilization and works in conjunction with other core muscle to keep your back safe. 
 

The overall main contributing factor of the diaphragm in core stabilization is through increased intra-abdominal pressure. This study used rapid upper body limb movements both seated and standing. The diaphragm activates in response to the reactive forces that challenge postural stability. Both sustained and frequent burst contractions of the diaphragm occurred as necessary to counter the reactive forces (Hodges, P., Gandevia, S., 2000).


Standing and sitting movements caused consistent activation of the diaphragm with little noticeable change. The ability of other core stabilizer muscles, such as the transversus abdominis and internal oblique abdominal muscles, to assist in postural stability or core stabilization are effected directly from the impact of the diaphragm’s production of increased intra- abdominal pressure (Hodges, P., Gandevia, S., 2000). 


The diaphragm’s role in core or postural stabilization is critical and the diaphragm is the key integrator within the core stabilization system of the body.

References:

Hodges, P., Gandevia, S. (2000). Activation of the human diaphragm during a repetitive postural task. The Journal of Physiology, 522, 165-175. http://jp.physoc.org/content/522/1/165.full


Eric Dempsey
NASM Certified Personal Trainer & Weight Loss Specialist
Dempsey's Resolution Fitness

Friday, February 14, 2014

Benefits and Risk Of Caffeine Use



Caffeine is one of the most widely used stimulants by both the general population and sport and fitness athletes. Benefits of caffeine use have been reported to include increased alertness, decreased fatigue, increased energy, decreased rate of perceived exertion, increased reaction times and many more. There are many conflicting studies citing the benefits of caffeine use. Most reports do agree that it has beneficial effects on both the metabolic process and the nervous system (Gonzalez, A., Walsh, A., Ratamess, N., Kang, J., Hoffman, j., 2011).

Moderate doses of caffeine have been shown to have a beneficial effect on performance when taken pre-workout or pre-activity. The means by which caffeine increases performance is still unclear although mounting data suggests causes come from multiple sources and have both metabolic effects and effects on the central nervous system. It has been reported that caffeine taken prior to exercise can spare carbohydrate usage and cause the rate of perceived exertion to be exaggerated and then suppressed as exercise intensity increases. More studies are needed to determine how caffeine provides its pre-exercise/workout benefits (Dean, S., Braakhuis, A., Paton, C., 2009).

Studies also indicate that while moderate doses of caffeine taken prior to exercise can increase performance, doubling the dose provides no additional benefit. It appears that moderate doses of caffeine are more beneficial for performance enhancement than low or large doses (Desbrow, B., Biddulph, C., Devlin, B., Grant, G., Anoopkumar-Dukie, S., Leveritti, M., 2012).

Another reported neural benefit of moderate doses of caffeine is the reduction of muscle pain during exercise. Research does indicate that caffeine may act as an antagonist with adenosine receptors. This may cause a reduction in pain signaling through neurotransmitters as well as other effects on the central nervous system. Again, more research is required to provide definitive answers on the role caffeine plays with the nervous system (Gliottoni, R., Meyers, J., Arngrímsson, S., Broglio, S., Motl, R., 2009).

Caffeine is reported to cause an increase in the amount of neurotransmitters available and has an enhancing impact on motor neurons which may partly explain why performance is increased with moderate doses (Gonzalez, A., Walsh, A., Ratamess, N., Kang, J., Hoffman, j., 2011).

It is generally accepted that low to moderate caffeine intake is safe for healthy adults. One risk factor reported frequently, states that ingesting caffeine prior to activity increases a person’s heart rate. This may be an issue for apparently healthy people who have an unknown heart condition. With this topic, there are also many conflicting reports concerning heart rate elevation. Studies have shown a higher heart rate level exists in people consuming moderate doses of caffeine prior to exercise due to caffeine’s impact on the sympathetic nervous system but no adverse effects have been widely documented (Dean, S., Braakhuis, A., Paton, C., 2009).

References:

Dean, S., Braakhuis, A., Paton, C. (2009). The Effects of EGCG on Fat Oxidation and Endurance Performance in Male Cyclists. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 20, 624-644.

Desbrow, B., Biddulph, C., Devlin, B., Grant, G., Anoopkumar-Dukie, S., Leveritti, M. (2012). The effects of different doses of caffeine on endurance cycling time trial performance. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30(2): 115–120.

Gliottoni, R., Meyers, J., Arngrímsson, S., Broglio, S., Motl, R. (2009). Effect of Caffeine on Quadriceps Muscle Pain During Acute Cycling Exercise in Low Versus High Caffeine Consumers. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 19, 150-161.

Gonzalez, A., Walsh, A., Ratamess, N., Kang, J., Hoffman, j. (2011). Effect of a pre-workout energy supplement on acute multi-joint resistance exercise. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 10, 261-266.

Eric Dempsey
NASM Certified Personal Trainer 
& Weight Loss Specialist


Monday, February 10, 2014

Creatine for Performance: Is it safe?


Creatine is one of the most studied supplements. It has been around for quite awhile and has been used by thousands of people seeking to increase performance. I have used creatine since the mid '90s and have used many different forms and brands. Did it work? Yes! Creatine increased my strength and power output greatly. 

The negative effects? I participated in a creatine study around 1997 while assigned to the Ranger Training Brigade at Fort Benning. We were given a 3 month supply of creatine monohydrate with instructions for use. 
While strength and power increased rapidly and substantially, water retention was an issue. Also, due to the large water uptake at cellular level and water retention, dehydration was a concern during endurance events. It hurt my runs and I had to really increase water intake. I had to make sure I only used it for strength training and not before any endurance events. 

Since then many different brands and formulas have come out eliminating the water retention issue. I started using muscletech celltech in the late '90s and had tremendous results with no negative effects. It quickly became my favorite form of creatine and I still use it to this day. Many of my clients have used it with great results. It's not popular but it works great. 

So creatine is great for strength and power training but not so great for endurance training. You have to use a brand that eliminates water retention and make sure you hydrate well. I will always recommend celltech.  

There are many articles and other reports claiming that creatine use can cause numerous health risks ranging from water retention, dehydration, muscle cramps, intestinal distress to kidney and renal issues. There is very little scientific data supporting these claims. There are, however, numerous scientific studies showing the benefits and safety of short term creatine use, without the alleged health risks.

While there is a vast amount of research data available concerning creatine use, there remain many circumstances, situations and variables that have not been analyzed and tested. Further testing is required for a more definitive spectrum of safety concerning creatine use. Current data that is available explores the use of creatine, primarily in short duration, while long term effects of creatine use remain unknown ( Cancela, P., Ohanian, C., Cuitiño, E., Hackney, A. C., 2008).

It is generally accepted, that taken in the recommended dosage, it is reasonably safe for a healthy individual, to use creatine (Lugaresi, R., Leme, M., Painelli, V., Murai, I., Roschel, H., Sapienza, M., Lancha, A., Gualano, J., Gualano, B., 2013).

Creatine use has been shown to have positive effects on performance in sports such as football, soccer, rugby, weightlifting and swimming. Creatine use in some long distance endurance events has had conflicting results, but has been shown not to have any significant performance enhancing effect (Hickner, R., Dyck, D., Josh Sklar, J., Hatley, H., Byrd, P., 2010).

References

Lugaresi, R., Leme, M., Painelli, V., Murai, I., Roschel, H., Sapienza, M., Lancha, A., Gualano, J., Gualano, B. (2013). Does long-term creatine supplementation impair kidney function in resistance-trained individuals consuming a high-protein diet? Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 10:26.

Cancela, P., Ohanian, C., Cuitiño, E., Hackney, A. C. (2008). Creatine supplementation does not affect clinical health markers in football players, British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 42 Issue 9, p731.

Gouttebargea, V., Inklaarb, H., Hautierc, C. A. (2012). Short-term oral creatine supplementation in professional football players: A randomized placebo-controlled trial. European Journal of Sports and Exercise Science, 1 (2):33-39.

Hickner, R., Dyck, D., Josh Sklar, J., Hatley, H., Byrd, P. (2010). 28 days of creatine ingestion on muscle metabolism and performance of a simulated cycling road race. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 7:26.

Eric Dempsey
NASM Certified Personal Trainer & Weight Loss Specialist

Sunday, February 9, 2014

Survival Series: Crisco Survival Candle



Using a regular can of crisco, you can simply insert a piece of wick, string, etc... and turn it into a long lasting survival candle.

Eric Dempsey
NASM Certified Personal Trainer
Dempsey's Resolution Fitness

Thursday, February 6, 2014

My 2 cents on the latest Biggest Loser shocker!

Ok my 2 cents on the latest Biggest Loser shocker! Everyone is talking about Rachel's massive weight loss and how she took it too far. You know the sheeple will never be happy. That's what crap shows like that are for.

There are millions who would trade places with her in a heartbeat. Who cares if she is bony, death camp survivor looking, unhealthy and might die tomorrow from a thousand different health issues, she is SKINNY. She is a beautiful and wonderful person, I'm sure, but she is very skinny.

She was actually able to do what everyone on the show has always wanted to do. So kudos to her. And anyone who says the oh I would never... BULL. People are jealous. That is what the sheeple crave. That is what society has trained the sheeple to know and love. The show has never been about health and fitness. Never will be. As long as you say weight loss and stick to the weight loss mantras, you will be doomed. Rachel is the result of weight loss. Is that really what you want?

Fat loss, body transformation, body composition and lean body mass development are heathy, fit terms that everyone should look into. Weight loss means that you end up looking like Rachel and the thousand other prisoners at the death camp. Fat loss means that you look healthy and fit.

For Rachel to be healthy and fit, she will need to put on some lean body mass and that will cause her to GAIN weight. OH NOOOOO!

Bottom line is that Rachel did exactly what the show asked of them and she won. She took it to the edge, literally, - death was probably close by.

It's a weight loss show - it's about losing pounds on the scale and she smoked that ass. It isn't about fitness and health, It's a weight loss show, It isn't about fitness and health, It's a weight loss show . . . . . get it?

But hey, congrats to her and all the best. If she is ever in town, I'd buy her a hamburger or ten. Hope she survives.

Great job biggest loser! You still suck. That is all.

http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-body/news/biggest-loser-winner-rachel-frederickson-goes-from-size-20-to-size-02-see-the-shocking-pictures-201452

Eric Dempsey
NASM Weight Loss Specialist