My Recommended High Quality Nutrition Supplements

Friday, October 31, 2014

Some basic home exercises for injured, older & disabled clients



Here are some exercises that you can do at home regardless of age or fitness level.

Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Cage Fighter (53) hits 235lbs on the barbell deadlift.


Cage Fighter (53) hits 235lbs on the barbell deadlift. That's a 35lb PR for her. Great job!

Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com 

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Get a bottle of Prograde EFA Icon made with 100% PURE Antarctic Krill Oil for F.R.E.E!



Prograde EFA Icon made with 100% PURE Antarctic Krill Oil for F.R.E.E! 

You just cover shipping. It was only like $7.45 when I got mine. That is a killer deal for Krill oil.

The smartship option is a convenient service but you can easily shut it off, if you don't want it.


Get yours today. 


Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Sunday, October 26, 2014

This Weeks Detox Water



This week's Detox water has pears, lime, ginger and lemons with a pinch of stevia.
Tastes good and is loaded with health benefits. Chop up fresh pears, limes, ginger and lemons and put it in a jug of filtered water. Let it soak. Then pour a glass and put a little stevia in it. Stir and drink. 

Detox water. Pears, lime, ginger and lemons. Drop the soda and try this for easy weightloss.   #weightloss

Drop the soda and try this for easy weight loss. 

For more detailed detox info look at my 21 Day Detox Challenge Program.

Give it a try.

Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Friday, October 24, 2014

Free Report: What Your Doctor NEVER Told You About Fish Oil

What Your Doctor NEVER Told You About Fish Oil  -  This Brand New Report Unveils The Disturbing Secrets Behind Quite Possibly The MOST Often Doctor Recommended Nutritional Supplement!

What Your Doctor NEVER Told You About Fish Oil

Get your free report here

We’ve just finished researching and writing a simple (but very powerful) health report that will be sure to ruffle some feathers. You see, most people – doctors included – have no idea the potential dangers swimming inside their bottle of fish oil. If you do just one thing this month to improve your overall health and well-being it needs to be reading every word of this shocking special report TODAY!


Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The Danger of Soy on Fight the Fat at Blog Talk Radio



The Danger of Soy

Check Out Fitness Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with Fight The Fat And Get Fit on BlogTalkRadio

Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

The Way Forward: I Need Your Feedback: Please Take My Quick 10 Question Survey!




Help me plan for the future with this quick 10 question survey! Be honest.

Once I finish Graduate school, I plan on revamping my programs and looking for a Columbus location again.

This will help me plan better programs to serve your specific needs.

Your participation is important and greatly appreciated.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/728J8DG

Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Monday, October 20, 2014

Are you a busy, hard working person? Why you need to detox!



If you are like me, you have daily stress in your life. You work hard and take care of your family. You are busy and time is precious. The standard American diet is not your friend.

Fast food, high calorie drinks, loads of processed foods, lots of flour, sugar, MSG, nitrates and artificial coloring and sweeteners have led our country to it's current health state. Over 33% of the country is obese and well over 50% are overweight. You might exercise but for many, it's not enough. You need help because your health depends on it.

While these statistics are gloomy and depressing, there is hope. It doesn't have to be this way for you. By making some lifestyle and behavior changes, along with changes to your way of thinking and nutrition program, you can be free of the standard American diet dilemma.

Detox programs have risen in popularity over the last few years. Most include promises of quick weight loss and increased health. Many involve the use and purchase of pills, shakes, creams and potions, with a lot of starving. I do not agree these type of programs at all.

That is why I decided to find a detox program that is healthy and involves whole food nutrition without the use and purchase of the quick fix extras. My detox program is an elimination based, whole foods program that has 3 levels and is Paleo friendly.

Your body builds up and retains toxins which lead to inflammation which causes health issues. To give your body and organs a break and a period of cleansing and healing, eliminating the ingestion and accumulation of toxins aids in reducing inflammation. By simply altering your food intake by eliminating toxic and inflammatory food, you can begin the process of cleansing and healing. Your body will process out more toxins and you will begin to look, feel and perform better. You do not have to starve yourself. Eating foods rich in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, with the right macronutrient levels of protein, fat and carbs, while maintaining a good level of hydration will quickly cause positive changes in your body. I always sum it up by saying that you need to eat the right amount of the right foods at the right time.

If you try my program for 21 days, you will be amazed at what you can achieve by simply making some changes to your eating. You don't need to starve, take pills, creams, shakes and potions. You just need to eliminate some types of foods that are toxic and inflammatory. The three levels of my program give you choices and the ability to try the program 3 separate times.

With my program you can expect to lose some pounds and inches while increasing your health and energy levels by eating good food. Some people have lost up to 20lbs on this program in three short weeks. Wouldn't that be cool? But in three week, if you lost any amount while becoming healthier and feeling better, it would be worth the low price of the program.

I only promote and sell programs and products that I believe in. This is one of those programs. You can do this detox program on your own, by yourself or you can do it with my support group and in conjunction with one of my fitness programs.

Take a look and see if this is something that could kickstart your journey towards health and fitness. You are worth it. Health is the most important gift that you can have. Start getting healthy today by joining the others who have made positive, life changing improvements with my program. Yesterday you said tomorrow. The time for health, energy and wellness is now. Click on the link for more details.

Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness

Saturday, October 18, 2014

The Wildlife Chronicles of Salem, AL: Woody Woodpecker



Several times a week, while sitting at my desk, typing papers for my Graduate degree classes and studying peer reviewed, scholarly articles and scientific studies, I hear this unrelenting knocking or tapping noise. It sounds like someone tapping a piece of wood with a metal rod. Tap, Tap, Tap......
It goes on for quite awhile to the point where it breaks my concentration and warrants investigation.



So I go outside to the large pine trees in front of my house and look around. Sure enough, Tap, Tap, Tap...... Then I see the culprit. A woodpecker of all things. Makes perfect sense of course. Now I have tried to get pictures of him. They come out blurry and out of focus because Woody does not like photo shoots. So I was forced to scour the web to find pics that resemble my particular brand of Woody.

Searching through several websites, I found a couple of possible suspects on www.outdooralabama.com. It appears that my Woody is either a Hairy woodpecker or a Downy Woodpecker. They look very much alike. And my Woody looks like both of them. I will conduct surveillance on Woody, the next time he is knocking on my tree. Hopefully, I will be able to make out some finer details to narrow down this mystery. And hopefully I'll be able to get my own pic of him. 

I don't really mind his knocking anymore, now that I know who it is. Nature is a wonderful thing most of the time, except for like the big ass tornado that almost blew my neighborhood away a few months ago. Woody is a good addition to the cast and characters that make up the wild circus outside my house. Who will be the next to make the list? Stay tuned to find out. Until then peace be with you and all that.

Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Fit Facts and Figures: How Exercise Improves Immune Function




How Exercise Improves Immune Function


The Immune System

For many of us, the immune system seems like a bit of a mystery. The immune system is large

and complex, and performs a wide variety of functions. Scientists and researchers are constantly

studying the immune system and making new discoveries.

Some of the factors that influence or affect the daily functioning of your immune system include

your age, gender, eating habits, medical status and fitness level.

Did you know that your skin is part of your immune system? Our skin is our first line of defense,

acting as a physical barrier to all the things in the world that can do harm to our body and make

us sick, such as bacteria and viruses.

White blood cells are another vital part of our immune system. There are many different types of

white blood cells that circulate throughout our body, playing different roles and all

communicating with one another.

A lesser known, but equally vital part of our immune system are hormones and cytokines.

Hormones and cytokines are important because they help cells communicate and help initiate

immune system defenses.

We don’t always think about it, but our immune system does a lot of great things every day to

keep us in good health. The immune system:

• Fights colds and flu viruses

• Deals with bacteria and viruses we may come in contact with

• Fights "bad" cells that form in our body (e.g., cells that could mutate and be cancerous)


Many Factors Influence Immunity

Your immune system is influenced by many things and will change throughout your life span.

Immune systems function differently for men and women, and vary from infancy to childhood,

and through adulthood. For pregnant women and older adults, changes to the system can be more

noticeable at times.

Your health can affect your immune system and vice versa. If you have a health condition, parts

of your immune system may not be working well enough or perhaps too well in some cases.

All aspects of our lifestyle can have an effect on our immune system, including the amount and

type of medications we may take for minor or major health conditions. Different aspects of our

lifestyles can also influence the immune system, including diet, stress levels and physical activity

levels.

SOURCE: Healthy U, Exercise and Our Immune System, Retrieved on March 4, 2014, from,

http://www.healthyalberta.com/1260.htm


Can Exercise Help?

Battling another cough or cold? Feeling tired all the time? Taking a daily walk or following a
simple exercise routine a few times a week may help you feel better.

Exercise not only helps your immune system fight off simple bacterial and viral infections, it
decreases your chances of developing heart disease, osteoporosis, and cancer.

We don't know exactly how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses, but there are
several theories.

• Physical activity may help by flushing bacteria out from the lungs (thus decreasing the
chance of a cold, flu, or other airborne illness) and may flush out cancer-causing cells
(carcinogens) by increasing output of wastes, such as urine and sweat.

• Exercise sends antibodies and white blood cells (the body's defense cells) through the
body at a quicker rate. As these antibodies or white blood cells circulate more rapidly,
they could detect illnesses earlier than they might normally. The increased rate of
circulating blood may also trigger the release of hormones that "warn" immune cells of
intruding bacteria or viruses.

• The temporary rise in body temperature may prevent bacterial growth, allowing the body
to fight the infection more effectively. (This is similar to what happens when the body
has a fever.)

• Exercise slows down the release of stress-related hormones. Stress increases the chance
of illness.

SOURCE: National Institutes of Health, Exercise and Immunity, Retrieved on March 4, 2014, from,
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007165.htm
Study Proves Exercise Boosts Immune System

The more physically fit and active you are, the less likely you are to suffer colds in the winter
months. That's the conclusion of US researchers, who studied about 1000 adults and found those
who exercised the most were least likely to suffer from colds in the winter months.

The researchers, from the Appalachian State University and the University of North Carolina,
have published their results online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. They followed a
group of 1002 healthy adults aged from 18 to 85 years, over a 12 week period during the US
autumn and winter seasons in 2008.

At the beginning of the study, the subjects were examined, and questioned on their diet and
lifestyle, including how much exercise they did and how fit they perceived themselves to be.
Then, every day over 12 weeks, each participant reported any symptom of respiratory illness
they experienced (such as sneezes, coughs, fever or other symptoms) and its severity, according
to a standardized scale called the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey.

Over the 12 weeks, the subjects reported experiencing symptoms of an upper respiratory tract
illness (URTI) on average for 13 days in the winter and 8 days in the autumn. But those who
were fit and exercised frequently were much less likely to develop a cold, and when they did, it
was much less severe.

Those in the top quarter for fitness levels (who did five or more days of exercise a week)
experienced 43 % fewer days with URTI symptoms than those in the lowest 25 % of fitness
levels (who did one day or less of exercise). And when they did get cold symptoms, the
symptoms were less severe. URTI symptoms were 32 % less severe in the top 25 % of exercisers
compared to the bottom 25 %.

(The researchers adjusted for various other factors that can affect immune response such as
mental stress, lack of sleep, poor nutrient status, and old age.)

Previous studies have also shown this relationship between fitness and reduced incidence and/or
severity of URTI symptoms, the researchers say. Exercise appears to reduce URTI incidence
anywhere from 18 to 67 per cent they say, depending on the study.

The precise nature of the link between exercise and increased immunity remains a mystery, but it
could be that each bout of exercise causes a transient increase in immune system activity,
increasing the numbers of white blood cells and immunoglobulin in the blood, which acts to
reduce a person’s susceptibility to disease the researchers suggest.

Associate Professor Stephen Turner from the Department of Microbiology & Immunology at
the University of Melbourne says he's not surprised at the findings. "As a general rule the
healthier you are, the easier you'll find it is to fight off infections", he says. “The effect may be
hormone-mediated. 

We know that people who exercise regularly have lower levels of stress hormones in the blood, and there's a definite link between low levels of stress hormones and improved immunity", he says.
Although it's impossible for most people to avoid catching colds altogether, the findings do
suggest that regular exercise can reduce a person's chances of catching a cold, and/or reducing its
severity if they do catch it.

SOURCE: ABC Science, Study Proves Exercise Boosts Immune System, Retrieved on March 4, 2014, from, http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2010/11/02/3054621.htm

Time to Get Moving

In general, it’s fair to say that research has shown that regular, moderate physical activity can be
beneficial to your immune system.

If you are just beginning to exercise more often, here are some tips:

• Take your time. Your immune system and the rest of your body will need time to adapt to
regular exercise.

• Start at a duration and intensity level you can easily manage. For some that may be 30
minutes, for others, it may be 10 minutes.

• Keep in mind that positive changes in your immune system are just one small additional
benefit you will get from regular exercise. There are many other health benefits as well,
such as improved cardiovascular fitness and endurance, and improved flexibility, muscle
strength and balance.

For people who exercise regularly, here are a few pointers:

• Light and moderate exercise won’t be harmful, and in some cases may make you feel
better when you are feeling a little under the weather.

• It’s okay to have a heavy workout, but it’s not necessary to do a heavy workout every
day. Your body and immune system need a chance to rest and return to a normal state.

For athletes and those who train hard (at high intensity levels):

• When you are following a heavy training regime, keep an eye on your health (e.g., watch
for signs of feeling worn out or cold/flu symptoms) and try to minimize other risk factors
for colds and viruses.

• Research has shown that consuming carbohydrates before a heavy training session may
help to ward off drastic immune changes, making you less susceptible to colds.

• Other research has shown that vitamin C may also help to ward off drastic immune
changes.

If you are feeling unwell, it may be best to delay your heavy training session until you are feeling
better.

SOURCE: Healthy U, Exercise and Our Immune System, Retrieved on March 4, 2014, from,
http://www.healthyalberta.com/1260.htm

For More Information

• Medline Plus – National Institutes of Health
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/

• The President’s Challenge Program
https://www.presidentschallenge.org/informed/digest/
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Eric Dempsey
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired
NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist
Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.
Dempseys Resolution Fitness
www.dempseysresolution.com

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Wheel Barrow Training for Fitness

Photo: Cage Fighter working the 250lbs of concrete with the wheel barrow

It may seem unlikely that a wheel barrow could have any use in fitness training. But it actually is a great fitness tool. Of course, you have to put considerable weight in the wheel barrow in order to get any real benefits.

My wheel barrow has 250lbs of concrete in it. This is heavy enough to challenge you while light enough for you to move quickly. The weighted wheel barrow works on cardio, core, upper and lower body and grip / forearm strength.

video


Moving in a straight line for varying distances as fast as you can without losing stabilization is a great workout. The turns have to be controlled so that you don't dump the wheel barrow. And like any resistance training tool, it is adjustable for different resistance loads.


So if you have access to a wheel barrow, give it a try. You will be surprised at how challenging the workout can be. 

Eric Dempsey

Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Retired

NASM Certified Personal Trainer and Weight Loss Specialist

Graduate Student in Exercise Science at Cal U.

Dempseys Resolution Fitness

www.dempseysresolution.com